House Bill introduced to end state personal income tax

In a bold proposal, Mississippi Speaker of the House Philip Gunn introduced a $1.38 billion plan to eliminate personal  income tax in Mississippi with House Bill 1629. Speaker Gun stated, “If we are going to do a tax cut, we want it to be real, substantial and make significant impact on the lives of those who are paying the tax.”

The press release provided the following key points of the bill that the House Ways and Means Committee passed February 24th:

  • 15 Year – $1,380,360,533 individual income tax elimination
  • 3% bracket eliminated by 2019
  • 4% bracket eliminated by 2022
  • 5% bracket eliminated by 2030
  • 3% revenue growth required
  • Mississippi family that makes $30,000 a year – $1,350 Raise
  • Mississippi family that makes $50,000 a year – $2,350 Raise
  • Mississippi family that makes $70,000 a year – $3,350 Raise

The Senate has approved Senate Bill 2839, a $382 million tax-cut proposal that phases out the business franchise tax and the personal income tax on the first $5,000 of taxable income.

For more information:

Mississippi runoff election information

Neither Thad Cochran nor Chris McDaniel earned “50% +1” of the vote in the June 3rd primary election so the Republican Party will conduct a runoff election June 24th.  In accordance with MS Code § 23-15-305, a primary candidate must have a majority of the vote cast to represent their party in the primary election.  For an interesting history on the provision, read the Washington Post’s “Runoff elections a relic of the Democratic South.”

The Clarion-Ledger identified the following rules for runoff elections in their June 4th report:

  • Voters who didn’t vote in Tuesday’s primary election can vote in the June 24 runoff election
  • If a person voted in the Democratic primary Tuesday, he or she can’t vote in the June 24th Republican runoff or vice versa
  • If a voter voted in the Republican primary, the voter can vote in the Republican runoff

A voter in the Democrat primary cannot participate in the Republican primary runoff due to provisions of MS Code § 23-15-575.  This statute states, “No person shall be eligible to participate in any primary election unless he intends to support the nominations made in the primary in which he participates.”  By voting in the Democrat Primary, the voter has already pledged their General Election vote to the Democrat nominee.

Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann simplified the information above on the Paul Gallo Radio Show by stating, “Let’s put it this way, people who voted in the Democratic primary, they’re all about 100,000 of them, they can’t vote in the Republican primary.  Everybody else can. . . Everyone who didn’t vote. . . have at it.”  This presumes that the voter was eligible and registered to vote for the June 3rd primary.

For more information: