Congress Declares National “Year of the Bible”

Our nation was founded as a Christian nation upon the Holy Bible! While you wouldn’t expect to hear that come from Washington, DC today, as recently as 33 years ago the U.S. Congress passed Public Law 97-280 making 1983 the “Year of the Bible.”

In their joint resolution, Congress not only recognized the Holy Bible as the Word of God, they acknowledged the Bible’s unique contribution to the foundation of our country and the blessings that followed our history. Echoing the sentiments of the founding fathers, the law quotes President Jackson who stated that the Bible is “the rock on which our Republic rests,” acknowledges “the value of voluntarily applying the teaching of the Scriptures in the lives of individuals, families, and societies,” and calls upon the nation to “to study and apply the teachings of the Holy Scriptures.”

The entire text below is courtesy of the Government Publishing Office.

Public Law 97-280

Public Law 97-280

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Are rights from God. . . or man? Part II

After Chris Cuomo’s quarrel with Judge Roy Moore, another media-type has expressed her belief that rights come from man. In response to Sen. Ted Cruz invoking God as the grantor of rights, Yahoo News political reporter Meredith Shiner posted:

If rights are granted by men, they can be taken away by men.

The Declaration of Independence declared that humans are “endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights” and the U.S. Constitution was created to prevent government from trampling them. In a 2001 interview, President Obama recognized the Constitution’s restraint on government: “It says what the states can’t do to you. Says what the federal government can’t do to you but doesn’t say what the federal government or state government must do on your behalf.”

Rights granted by men are artificial or man-made but certainly not natural and unalienable! Shiner should thank God for all of her rights, including her 1st Amendment right to speak her mind–even if she doesn’t know Who granted them.

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The real work remains in Hobby Lobby vs. Obamacare

The experts say Hobby Lobby had a good day in the Supreme Court yesterday:

Even if what the Cato Institute tweeted is true, the work has just begun as Dr. Chuck Harding points out:

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Sun Herald: Mississippi lawmakers feel pressure over religion bill

The issues confronting the Miss. Legislature of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act are addressed in the Sun Herald’s Mississippi lawmakers feel pressure over religion bill.

The Miss. Senate passed Senate Bill 2681 earlier this year while the Miss. House will debate the bill next week.  While the most divisive provisions (the ones that caused the national outcry over Arizona’s passing in a similar bill) have been removed, opponents still see the bill as unnecessary or still allowing discrimination.  Supporters of the original language of the bill question why the bill is needed at all if it only reaffirms the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

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“All Animals Are Equal”

Animal FarmIn George Orwell’s 1945 allegorical novel, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, lead a revolt against Mr. Jones to take-over the farm which they rename “Animal Farm.”  While attempting to establish a utopia they think humans failed to create for them, Snowball and Napoleon establish the Seven Commandments of Animalism with the 7th and most important being “All animals are equal.”

In the subsequent struggles for power, the pigs take-over and Napoleon runs-off Snowball and declares himself the leader.  Over the years, the pigs began to resemble the humans they once detested and the seven commandments are ultimately reduced to a single phrase, “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

Our nation’s obsession with civil rights is beginning to make some special interests groups more equal than others.  The current debate in Arizona over the right of a baker to refuse service to a person with whom he disagrees illustrates this.

If a merchant refuses service on personal, religious convictions, it is considered offensive, bigoted, and unlawful:

However, if a gay person refuses service to another based on a difference in beliefs, it’s considered heroic:

As long as you are in the preferred group, your “rights” trump others’ rights.  Because in 21st Century America, every one is equal–some are just more equal than others.

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Religious Freedom Restoration Act Passes in Miss. Senate

In addition to adding “In God We Trust” to the state seal as previously passed, Mississippi Senate Bill 2681 affirms the right of individuals to exercise their religion. Exercise of religion is defined as “the practice or observance of religion” and includes “the ability to act or refusal to act in a manner that is substantially motivated by one’s sincerely held religious belief.”

The ACLU claims  that the bill is “simply a license to discriminate” and special interest groups label the bill as “anti-gay” even though SB 2681 names no specific groups.  The discourse has been amplified recently by the Arizona State Legislature’s passage of a similar bill, Arizona Senate Bill 1062, which was subsequently vetoed by Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer.

Gov. Phil Bryant has remained neutral on the current discussion.  Mississippi House Bill 929, “Mississippi Religious Freedom Restoration Act,” appears to be the companion legislation to SB 2681 but HB 929 died in committee in early February 2014.  According to the Sun Herald, the Mississippi House Judiciary Committee B is considering SB 2681 and may remove parts that allow people to refuse service to others based on religious beliefs.  As modified, it appears the bill will prevent the state from burdening an individual with respect to religious freedom but does not protect individuals from being burdened by other private entities.

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